COVID-19 update: Client advice on what to do during the Coronavirus crisis

Advice

Read our latest pet advice

The Lady Dane knowledgebase contains a range of information and advice on a variety of topics including vaccinations, neutering, micro chipping, pet passport, new puppy, new kitten, geriatric patients, medication, flea and worm prevention.

  • Neutering
  • Pet Passports
  • Vaccinations and Boosters
  • Worming

Neutering

Neutering and Spaying Cats

A female cat will have her first 'season' at about 6 months of age, and at this time she becomes sexually active and ready for mating. She will start to 'call' for about 4-7 days in every 21, and during this time she will become vocal and may show changes in temperament and posture. Cats tend to come into 'season' at particular times of the year.

The only way to ensure that unwanted pregnancies do not occur is to have your cat spayed at about 5 to 6 months of age. Every year, countless unwanted kittens and cats are destroyed, so think carefully about homing any kittens which are produced before your decide to breed from your cat.

If however you do wish to breed from your cat at some future date, then a course of medication to postpone 'calling' may be recommended and prescribed by your vet.

Likewise, a tom cat will become sexually mature at about 5 to 6 months of ago, and at this time he may start to display 'male' behaviour such as roaming, fighting and spraying. Such behaviour may cause problems for the owner and cat and can be largely prevented by having your tom cat neutered.

Your vet and practice nurse will be happy to advise on neutering or spaying your cat.

 

Neutering and Spaying Dogs

'Heat' or 'season' is the time when a bitch is ready for mating and when pregnancy may result. The first 'heat' occurs at 6 to 9 months of ago, and the average bitch comes on 'heat' twice yearly.

During the first stage of 'heat' a bitch prepares for mating and her vulva swells, discharging blood-stained fluid. She becomes attractive to dogs, and her temperament may be affected at this time - this period may last for approximately 7-10 days. The bitch will then be receptive to the male for a further 7-10 days period, so it is advisable to isolate the bitch for three weeks during her season.

Problems that a bitch in 'heat' can pose (e.g. when going on holiday) are best discussed with a vet well in advance; suitable medication may be prescribed to postpone the season.

If you have no intention of ever breeding from your bitch you may wish to have her spayed - the benefits of spaying can be explained to you by your vet or a practice nurse.

Likewise, you may have a male dog whom you wish to have neutered. Again, your vet or a practice nurse will be happy to discuss the benefits of this procedure with you.

Pet Passports

Pet Passport Scheme - Dogs and Cats

  1. Your pet will require a microchip
  2. Your pet must be 3 calendar months of age
  3.  They must have had at least ONE rabies vaccine at least 21 days before travelling to Europe or entering the UK.    We recommend two primary vaccines, 4 weeks apart, as we believe this gives your pet the best immunity.
  4. They still require a stamped and signed PET PASSPORT.
  5. DOGS ONLY must be treated against TAPEWORM before returning to the UK, between 24 and 120 hours (1 to 5 days)

NOTES

Treatment against tapeworm must be performed by a qualified vet and recorded in the pet passport. This does not apply to dogs travelling from Finland, Malta or Ireland The tapeworm is Echinococcus multilocularis. Treatment must be with an approved product - containing the active ingredient PRAZIQUANTEL.  Pets going on day trips will need to have had the treatment carried out in the UK between 1 to 5 days before travel Treatment for TICKS is no longer a requirement, however we still recommend appropriate treatment in areas where ticks, sandfly or heartworm are common, e.g. South of France. We are happy to advise on this.

Please contact the Lady Dane Veterinary Centre on 01795 532180 for more information. Alternatively information can be obtained from Defra on 0870 241 1710.

Vaccinations and Boosters

Puppies and dogs are susceptible to several dangerous and fatal diseases:

Distemper - affects dogs of all ages but is particularly common in puppies. It usually results in death and is characterised by respiratory signs such as runny eyes and nose, and nervous signs such as fits may follow.

Parvovirus - characterised by a profuse foul-smelling, blood-stained diarrhoea which usually leads to dehydration, collapse and death. Again, it is most common in puppies but can affect old, unvaccinated dogs.

Canine Viral Hepatitis - a very contagious disease whose symptoms are a high fever, vomiting and stomach pains. Again, it can prove fatal.

Leptospirosis - dogs infected by Leptospira bacteria can suffer liver and kidney damage and require prolonged nursing and treatment if they are to fully recover.

Parainfluenza - one of the causes of infectious bronchitis ('kennel cough'), it is highly infectious.

Bordetella Bronchiseptica - one of the key causes of infectious bronchitis ('kennel cough'), which is highly infectious. It can appear as a harsh hacking cough which is distressing to both owner and dog.

 

 

Cats and kittens are threatened by several dangerous diseases:

Feline Panleucopaenia - commonly known as 'enteritis', this disease is most common and most severe in young kittens. Infected animals may die within 24 hours of the appearance of symptoms.

Feline Rhinotracheitis and Feline Calicivirus - these two diseases are the most common cause of 'cat flu' in the UK. 'Cat flu' is highly infectious and unless prompt treatment is given it can prove fatal. Even if treated in time, some cats are permanently affected with chronic snuffles.

Feline Leukaemia (FeLV) - FeLV is the number one infectious killer of cats in the western world. This is because it reduces the cat's resistance to other infectious diseases. Young cats are most commonly affected, but it is possible to reveal infecton of FeLV through a simple blood test carried out by your vet.

 

Ask your vet or practice nurse for advice and to book an appointment.

Worming

Worming for Dogs

Dogs are commonly affected by two types of worms - roundworms and tapeworms

Roundworms are usually found in puppies and resemble small pieces of string. Puppies can be infected from their mothers and signs of infestations include failure to thrive, pot bellies and gastrointestinal upsets (vomitting and diarrhoea).

In puppies and adult dogs the eggs of the roundworm are passed in the motions, where they are a source of infection for other dogs. Unfortunately these worms can also infect humans, so worming is doubly important as is preventing your dog fouling areas where people, especially children, may become infected.

Tapeworms are common in adult dogs, and although they can be quite long in size, only segments are usually visible around the bottom of the dog or in its motions, and these resemble flattened grains of rice.

For the health and wellbeing of your pet, and for the prefention of the spread of worms to other dogs and humans, your dog should be regularly wormed.

Puppies should be wormed from 2-3 weeks of age until they are 3 months old, and then at least every 3 to 6 months throughout their life.

Don't let children kiss dogs, and prevent dogs from licking their faces.

It is advisable to wash your hands after handling your dog and before eating. Treatment of fleas will also aid in the prevention of the spread of tapeworm.

Ask your vet or a practice nurse for advice on the treatment of both types of worms.

 

Worming for Cats

Roundworms are usually found in kittens and adult cats and resemble small pieces of string. Kittens can be infected from their mothers and signs of infestation include loss of condition, pot bellies and the vomiting of worms. In kittens and adult cats, the eggs of the roundworm are passed in the motions, where they are a source of infection for other cats.

Unfortunately these worms can also infect humans, so worming is doubly important as is preventing a child from playing in litter trays or areas where cat faeces are present.

Tapeworms are common in adult cats and although they can be quite long in size, only segments are usually visible around the bottom of the cat or in its motions, and these resemble flattened grains of rice.

Cats pick up tapeworms mainly through hunting and from fleas. Regular flea treatment will also help in their control.

For the health and wellbeing of your pet, and for the prevention of the spread of worms to other cats and humans, your cat should be regularly wormed. Kittens should be regularly wormed from 2-3 weeks of age until 12 weeks of age, and then at least every 3 to 6 months throughout their life.

Ask your vet or a practice nurse for advice on the treatment of both types of worms.

Practice information

Faversham

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Lady Dane Veterinary Centre Graveney Road Faversham Kent ME13 8UR
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Charing

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Lady Dane Veterinary Centre The Old Pumping Station Pluckley Road Charing TN27 0AH
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Whitstable

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Lady Dane Veterinary Centre 158 Cromwell Road Whitstable Kent CT5 1NA
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